I carry a pretty big purse these days to hold… well, all the things. Why I need to carry 4 types of chapstick, a water bottle, at least 3 granola bars (#hangry), floss, and numerous scraps of paper with me at any given time, I cannot really say. I just know that I do. The only downside to my giant purse is the fact that I’m guaranteed to lose my keys for at least 5 minutes in the bottom of my purse while standing at my car in the parking lot with a cart full of groceries. (Okay, okay. Mostly heart shaped Reece’s, mascara, and cereal.) 😉

To bring some order to my purse (and gym bag and 1 drawer in my craft room), I made some new zipper pouches. And, since I wanted to finally learn how to use the embroidery arm on my sewing machine, I bedazzled them with some metallic thread.

Create a Monogrammed Zipper Pouch using this simple tutorial at Sewbon.comCreate a Monogrammed Zipper Pouch using this simple tutorial at Sewbon.com Create a Monogrammed Zipper Pouch using this simple tutorial at Sewbon.com

Want to make one (or three) too? Let’s get started!

Materials

  • Main Fabric (I used Robert Kaufman Railroad Denim)
  • Lining Fabric (I used a navy quilting cotton from my stash)
  • Zipper Tab Fabric
  • 7 Inch Zipper for small size or 9 Inch Zipper for large size
  • Thread for Embroidery Design (I used Clarks metallic)
  • Embroidery Bobbin Thread
  • Basting Spray Adhesive (I used Spray n Bond)
  • Medium Weight Tear Away Stabilizer (I used Sulky)
  • Zipper Foot
  • General Sewing Supplies

Notes

  • I sew on an Elna eXpressive 920 that has an embroidery arm f you don’t have an embroidery machine, you can skip the instructions on how to embroider. But, you can bedazzle the zipper pouches with appliqué, hand stitching, or fabric paint.
  •  When using metallic thread with machine embroidery, slow down the stitch speed to the slowest setting. This will help keep the thread from breaking.
  • When machine embroidering, use the right kind of stabilizer for the fabric being embroidered. I found that a medium weight tear away stabilizer helped keep my designs from getting wavy. I used basting spray adhesive to temporarily attach the stabilizer to my fabric.

Instructions

One: Using the instructions for the machine, attach and set up the sewing machine for embroidery. I used white bobbin thread and metallic embroidery thread.

Two: Prep the fabric by attaching the stabilizer and hoop the fabric. I attached my stabilizer with temporary basting spray.

Three: Select a design on the machine. I used the three character monogram for the large zipper pouch and I wrote out some phrases using one of the embroidery fonts for the small zipper pouches. Push the Start/Stop button to embroider the design.

Create a Monogrammed Zipper Pouch using this simple tutorial at Sewbon.com

Four: If tearaway stabilizer was used, remove the stabilizer from the back of the fabric.

Five: Cut the embroidered fabric to the following dimensions with the design centered on the fabric based on the size pouch desired. Also cut one more from the main fabric for the back of the pouch and two from the lining fabric.

  • Small: 9 wide by 5 inches tall
  • Large: 11 wide by 7 inches tall

Six: Cut two from the zipper tab fabric to 1.5 inches wide by 3 inches tall

Create a Monogrammed Zipper Pouch using this simple tutorial at Sewbon.com

Seven: Take the zipper tab fabric and fold the short sides towards each other, meeting in the middle. Then, fold it in half again. Press. Repeat for the second zipper tab.

Create a Monogrammed Zipper Pouch using this simple tutorial at Sewbon.com

Eight: Open the zipper half way and baste stitch the open ends.

Create a Monogrammed Zipper Pouch using this simple tutorial at Sewbon.com

Nine: Place one zipper tab on the end of the zipper and sew close to the edge of the tab. Repeat for the other side of the zipper.

Create a Monogrammed Zipper Pouch using this simple tutorial at Sewbon.com

Ten: With the main embroidered fabric piece right side up, place the zipper upside down with the zipper pull on the left, in the top middle of the fabric. Make sure the top of the zipper is aligned with the top of the main fabric piece. Pin and then baste stitch.

Create a Monogrammed Zipper Pouch using this simple tutorial at Sewbon.com

Eleven: Pin the lining on top of the main fabric with the zipper attached, right sides together. Using a zipper foot, stitch along the top of the zipper, just below the baste line.

Create a Monogrammed Zipper Pouch using this simple tutorial at Sewbon.com

Twelve: Pull the main fabric and the lining together at one side and press.

Thirteen: With the second main fabric piece right side up, place the sewn zipper piece on top, right sides together, aligning the top of the zipper with the top of the second main fabric piece. Pin and then baste stitch.

Create a Monogrammed Zipper Pouch using this simple tutorial at Sewbon.com

Fourteen: Pin the lining on top of the main fabric piece, right sides together. Using a zipper foot, stitch along the top of the zipper, just below the baste line.

Fifteen: Pull the main fabric and the lining together at the side and press.

Create a Monogrammed Zipper Pouch using this simple tutorial at Sewbon.com

Sixteen: Top stitch the main fabric to the lining fabric on each side near the zipper.

Seventeen: Open the zipper almost all the way. Pull the main fabric pieces together at one side and the lining fabric pieces together at the other side and pin.

Create a Monogrammed Zipper Pouch using this simple tutorial at Sewbon.com

Eighteen: Using a 1/2 inch seam allowance, stitch completely around, leaving a 3 inch opening in the lining. Backstitch at the beginning and end. Clip the corners.

Nineteen: Turn the bag right side out through the opening.

Twenty: Machine or hand stitch the opening closed and tuck the lining into the bag. Press and you are done!

Create a Monogrammed Zipper Pouch using this simple tutorial at Sewbon.com

Create a Monogrammed Zipper Pouch using this simple tutorial at Sewbon.com

Create a Monogrammed Zipper Pouch using this simple tutorial at Sewbon.com

Disclaimer: This post and the corresponding tutorial was created as part of my partnership with Elna and their On Loan / Boutique Designers program. But, as always, the content and thoughts expressed in this post are my own. To learn more about my genuine love of Elna, check out this post here.